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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
for word of every doe midwest incommunication in this country. >> the idea that n.s.a. is keeping files on americans as a general rule just isn't true. >> woodruff: then, rebels fired scores of rockets on the syrian city of homs as the assad regime celebrated army day. margaret warner gets the latest on the bloody civil war from npr's deborah amos. >> brown: law enforcement bids farewell to f.b.i. director robert mueller. ray suarez explores the transformation of the bureau after the 9-11 attacks. >> woodruff: and we hear from two u.s. senators leading the push to keep the military's sexual assault cases in the chain of command. gwen ifill talks to new hampshire republican kelly ayotte and missouri democrat claire mccaskill. >> the other side has wanted to make this argument about victims vs. uniforms. that's a false premise. this argument is about how we can protect victims the best. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by th
snowden? his lawyer will not say, but he did confirm the fugitive nsa analyst has been granted temporary asylum in russia and has left the airport transit area. >> what concern is his place of residence? he will choose it himself. he can live in a hotel or an apartment. he is one of the most wanted people on earth. they will make sure his place of residence is absolutely safe. >> snowden could attempt to reach countries who have offered him asylum. >> latin america is a far way off in more ways than just geography. >> it's snowden stays in russia, he could become a stumbling block in u.s.-russian relations. washington wants moscow to extradite snowden to face charges of espionage and the theft of class of five nsa documents, but that is something the russian government has declined to do. >> where might snowden be? is he safe? for more, let's cross over to our moscow correspondent. do we have any idea where snowden may be and what his conditions are for him in russia? >> his whereabouts are still the big secret that is not revealed due to security reasons. for told the last image was a m
: overreach at the n.s.a.; a planet-hunter goes dark; opening up a pristine rain forest to oil drilling; shields and brooks on the week's news; plus, harper and musslewhite on playing the blues. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> reporter: the number of dead in thursday's car bombing in beirut, leban, went up at least 22 today, with more than 300 wounded. it was the deadliest attack there in nearly three decades, engulfing a busy street in fire and smoke. the site is near a complex where the shiite militant group hezbollah holds rallies. today, the group's leader, sheikh hassan nasrallah, blamed sunni radicals. he pledged to double the number of hezbollah forces helping fight sunni rebels in syria. a sudden wave of refugees from syria is pouring into northern iraq. u.n. refugee officials reported today that many come from aleppo, syria's largest city, and their numbers approach 8,000 a day. they've been crossing at a new bridge over the tigris river. there already are more than 150,000 syrian refugees registered in iraq. wall street ended a tough week on a dow
. >> consequences are being drawn from the nsa's global spying for graham. the foreign ministry has announced it is ending a kids- old surveillance agreement. it was a joint understanding. >> the decision comes as new reports show cooperation -- corporations working with authorities to gather private data. companies developed software to help in the surveillance. >> britain's a guest spy agency. it is reported to have even paid telecommunications customer need companies to snoop on customers. the data lines are utilized by internet users by other countries. >> we must untangle this web. intelligence agencies are the responsibility of the government. if private companies are involved that can only happen under special circumstances. >> german lawmakers want to know more about the spying revelations and what the government knew about british and american snooping activities. chancellor merkel's chief of staff is to be grilled again in 10 days time. >> how significant is the cancellation of the intelligence agreement with london and washington question mark this had been in the works for a while
pressure from british police. "the guardian" newspaper has destroyed hard drives with nsa documents but says there are safe copies elsewhere. >> the lead him of the muslim brotherhood in egypt has been the white house criticizes the move and considers cutting aid to cairo. >> get them while they are hot -- he gets to the soccer world cup go on sale in brazil -- tickets to the soccer world cup go on sale in brazil. >> the british government is stepping up its pressure on journalists looking into the nsa's global spying operations. police in london have overseen the destruction of hard drives at "the guardian" newspaper. >> but the efforts were to no avail because editors say there are copies in other locations, some of which are believed to be here in berlin. >> this latest effort comes after the partner of the journalists breaking the story was detained. >> two british security officials recently arrived at "the guardian" newspaper in london. their mission was to oversee the destruction of hard drives containing documents leaked by edward snowden. in the weeks before that, the briti
the top intelligence agents. they want to know how they aided programs directed at citizens. the nsa affair has been laid to rest. he has given the parliamentary intelligence committee written confirmation that it never broke german law. the nsa does get information from germany, collected by the intelligence agency. it gathers information in many parts of the world. >> the data is almost exclusively data on foreign activities. >> the opposition parties said that they have a duty to protect parties. the u.s. -- they want to know more about how the u.s. software works. >> we still do not know how it works. what privacy rights are being threatened? how much information is the u.s. collecting on german citizens? >> the government says it will continue to ask washington about what is going on and answer the concerns of the german public. the need to regain voters trust. >> inspectors have arrived to investigate claims that they have been used. >> they will spend the next two weeks gathering evidence but stopped short of determining who is responsible for any of the alleged attacks. >> ea
appears possible at this point, the nsa surveillance affair does appear to have dented chancellor angela merkel 's credibility among voters, but she still outclasses her main challenger, peer steinbrueck. if germans had to vote today for chancellor, 55% would choose merkel, versus 22%. 17% which is neither. most germans would prefer a grand coalition. steinberg has said such a coalition would have to go ahead without him -- time brewing -- steinbrueck. >> it was one of the most shocking events in south african history, the massacre of 34 miners. >> south africans have been commemorating the anniversary. >> the president backed out of the ceremonies, having lost support of many mineworkers. opponents say the case exposes his failure to tackle south africa's problems. >> gathering at the rocky outcrop to remember the men who were gunned down more than a year ago. the miners said they would continue their struggle. >> we need to make sure that there is no blood that is going to be shut again. >> the massacre was south africa's deadliest labor incident since the end of apartheid. the governm
the magnitude of the nsa surveillance program and also had some effect on politics. two very different cases when it comes to handling the content of them. >> thanks so very much. here in berlin, police have been keeping protesters apart on the third day of demonstrations over a newly opened center for up to 400 asylum-seekers. tensions flared and there were arrests when supporters sought to end a rally by anti- immigration groups. >> the number of asylum seekers in germany has almost doubled year on year to over 52,000. the issue of immigration, surprisingly, is not a major topic of discussion in the campaign ahead of the september 22 election. >> many of the refugees come from conflict zones. afghanistan or serious. but they have not found peace in germany. this is what they have to put up with. opponents make their views clear. most of them clearly belong to the far right. on the other side are those who support the refugees. the atmosphere is heated. every day, more protesters arrived, wanting to show that the majority of germans are not xenophobic. >> i think it is important we make a c
widely used in the world today. her family never had a say in this. why did the nsa seek its buy-in now? >> what happened this year is different. hela cells, yes, have been used in almost every laboratory, including my own. now what we've had happen is read out the complete d.n.a. instruction book, the genome of hela cells, laying out all kinds of details about why those cells grow so rapidly, but also revealing something about henrietta's original d.n.a. instruction book, which,sh, has implications for the family, and her blood relatives raised concerns, rightly so, that this information being freely available on the internet might be placing them at risk for people learning things about their medical risks for the future, that they would like to keep private. >> warner: so this agreement you negotiated with the family, what does it grant them? what does it give them? >> well, over three long meetings in the evening in baltimore with the family-- and i give them a huge amount of credit for rallying together and dealing with some pretty complicated scientific facts-- ultimately, they ar
of information he has about american intelligence about the n.s.a. for their own good. that would be acting they might consider in their own national interest. so are they doing that giving him everything he knows? >> and you can ask the same question about the chinese when he was in hong kong. >> rose: what do you assume? >> i would assume that their intelligence services would be delinquent in their duty if they didn't make every effort to do that. i don't know the answer. >> rose: i talked to a former c.i.a. person and said would we be doing that if we had the opportunity? of course. >> his father says it hasn't happened. i don't know. i don't know. >> rose: okay, what about syria? is -- where do you think -- where do you think the effort to put together some kind of -- and the united states desperately wants and john kerry desperately wants russian cooperation to figure out a way to stop syria from becoming a stalemate and a civil war that just goes on and on and on. >> rose: and putin wants it, too. so you would think that would be enough to act on. here's the conflict no story began y
was responded to ve very well. you don't like the nsa -revelations. if you're on the right distrust of big government has always been an article of fate. it's not just cynicism and it's not just media exploitation. there is a genuine reaction against in part philosophically but also what's perceived as the incompetence of government. >> what about the idea or ideal of a public good that has runun through our history.->> the founders of course spent much of their time contemplatingting this idea of a public good trying to set up a situation in which partisan impulses, internal impulses regional impulses, state impulses in which all of these would be tamped down enough that in fact the government would function tamed down now where it will functio gislators who would act in broad public good.egislators that will act in a 1345u8 public small r republican ideal originally.nd of and of course that's worked better and less well over the years since. i think what we really lost now is a conversation about it. i mean it's sort of been taken
from british police. "the guardian" newspaper has destroyed hard drives with nsa documents but says there are safe copies elsewhere. >> the lead him of the muslim brotherhood in egypt has been the white house criticizes the move and considers cutting aid to cairo. >> get them while they are hot -- he gets to the soccer world cup go on sale in brazil
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)